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What we do and why

We are a community committed to helping people get back on track after time spent on the streets or in a cell

Oxford is known across the world for its breathtaking beauty and ancient university. But every night people sleep rough on the pavements beneath its famous spires.

Many have jobs but still can’t afford the city’s high rents. Rough sleeping is a brutal, dangerous way to live, with a life expectancy of 44.

Homelessness has risen steeply year on year for the last 10 years. Cuts to support services, precarious private renting, relationship breakdown, addiction and a number of other factors have left people with little choice but to sleep on the streets.

This includes those who have recently left prison without adequate support (often after spending much of their lives in institutions). Crucially, people in this position are significantly more likely to reoffend than those released into housing: a recent Ministry of Justice freedom of information request showed that of all adult prisoners released in 2016, 67% of those who were homeless went on to reoffend. A painful cycle of offending, rough sleeping and reoffending can set in.

Challenges like these are complex, deeply-rooted and hard to overcome without intensive, long-term support.

Oxford is known across the world for its breathtaking beauty and ancient university. But every night people sleep rough on the pavements beneath its famous spires.

Many have jobs but still can’t afford the city’s high rents. Rough sleeping is a brutal, dangerous way to live, with a life expectancy of 44.

Homelessness has risen steeply year on year for the last 10 years. Cuts to support services, precarious private renting, relationship breakdown, addiction and a number of other factors have left people with little choice but to sleep on the streets.

This includes those who have recently left prison without adequate support (often after spending much of their lives in institutions). Crucially, people in this position are significantly more likely to reoffend than those released into housing: a recent Ministry of Justice freedom of information request showed that of all adult prisoners released in 2016, 67% of those who were homeless went on to reoffend. A painful cycle of offending, rough sleeping and reoffending can set in.

Challenges like these are complex, deeply-rooted and hard to overcome without intensive, long-term support.

The city may be a place of inequality, but it also has a history of people being inspired by the example of Jesus to tackle poverty and injustice.

Today is no different. Alongside ACT’s small staff team, over 100 volunteers from all walks of life across Oxford form a community of support to serve rough sleepers, prisoners and people transitioning away homelessness and prison.

We seek to provide the carefully targeted help people need to address issues which made them vulnerable in the first place, so we focus on offering:

  • A community: shared meals, activities and celebrations. This gives people who may struggle with low self-esteem or rejection an invaluable sense of connection, accountability and belonging
  • A home: stability and safety after life on the streets
  • A mentor: direction and momentum – help setting and achieving goals and accessing employment
  • A new lease of life: we help people flourish by supporting them as they develop long-overlooked talents. Examples include K, who is honing a talent for powerful songwriting and R, who is growing in skill and confidence as a public speaker.

Getting your life back on track after years of homelessness or imprisonment is a tough challenge.

That’s why we’re here for the long haul, a community committed to seeing people discover their value, rebuild their lives – and flourish.

The city may be a place of inequality, but it also has a history of people being inspired by the example of Jesus to tackle poverty and injustice.

Today is no different. Alongside ACT’s small staff team, over 100 volunteers from all walks of life across Oxford form a community of support to serve rough sleepers, prisoners and people transitioning away homelessness and prison.

We seek to provide the carefully targeted help people need to address issues which made them vulnerable in the first place, so we focus on offering:

  • A community: shared meals, activities and celebrations. This gives people who may struggle with low self-esteem or rejection an invaluable sense of connection, accountability and belonging
  • A home: stability and safety after life on the streets
  • A mentor: direction and momentum – help setting and achieving goals and accessing employment
  • A new lease of life: we help people flourish by supporting them as they develop long-overlooked talents. Examples include K, who is honing a talent for powerful songwriting and R, who is growing in skill and confidence as a public speaker.

Getting your life back on track after years of homelessness or imprisonment is a tough challenge.

That’s why we’re here for the long haul, a community committed to seeing people discover their value, rebuild their lives – and flourish.

Contact ACT

ACT
40 Pembroke Street
Oxford
OX1 1BP

hello@ACTOxford.com
01865 254800

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